Sweet 16 Cream -New Experimental Lotion Recipe

Tonight I was feeling experimental, so I concocted a new cream recipe and did some experiments on it.  We’ll have to wait and see what happens to it tomorrow.  I may have pushed the envelope too far, or it could be great.  Only time will tell.

I decided to call this “Sweet 16 Cream” because I included many anti-aging oils and ingredients.   The essential oils blend I used smells sweet, innocent, and light – like a carefree 16-year-old (or a marshmallow) (or both).

I only scented half of the batch because I wanted to see what the recipe was like both with and without the addition of the essential oils.  The scented half is brown because of the vanilla essential oil.   It looks darker in the pictures than in person.   It is really more of an almond color, but in contrast to the stark white of the paper towel and the unscented lotion, it looks darker.

For the water  phase, I chose distilled water, aloe liquid, sodium lactate (humectant, thickener), and liquid silk (for some sheen and slip).  I reduced the amount of water to below 70% because I am using less stearic acid and I wanted a thicker lotion or cream.

For the oils phase I chose hempseed, argan and safflower oils.  All of these are great for mature skin and are light-weight oils (so it won’t feel greasy or heavy). I added a generous amount of mango butter because it is great for aging skin has no scent, and the addition of butters makes thicker creams.   I used BTMS-50 as my main emulsifier so it would be conditioning.  I added only a small amount of stearic acid (because I don’t like the smell of it).  I also threw in a little vitamin E because the hempseed oil has a shorter shelf life.

For the cool-down phase, I chose a couple of aging-skin-loving extracts (carrot and green tea), and of course, a preservative.  I used Optiphen.   I don’t much like the smell of Optiphen either, but I suppose all chemical preservatives are going to have some smell.  It smells a little bit “perfumey” to me.

I am posting the recipe below, but at this point I am not sure if it is a success or not.   It does not seem as stable as the other lotions I have made, so it may separate.  I will post an update later this week after it sits for a few days.

Update: 2-Dec-16 – Hooray, we have success!   It did not separate overnight.  It is not creamy like pudding but more “airy” and fluffy.  I may have stick blended too long and whipped in some air.   Either way it feels great on the skin.   The vanilla has died down a bit, allowing the bergamot and neroli to shine through.  It smells so lovely (and less like a marshmallow).  I put some on my hand and I can’t stop smelling it.     I have a new favorite essential oil combination now.

Sweet 16 Cream Recipe:

(makes about 8 ounces / 226.8 grams)

sweet16cream1

Water Phase:

  • Distilled Water – 4.8 oz (135.6 grams) – 59.8%
  • Aloe Liquid – 0.8 oz (22.7 grams) – 10%
  • Liquid Silk – 0.1 oz (2.3 grams) – 1%
  • Sodium Lactate – 0.1 oz (2.3 grams) – 1%

Oils Phase:

  • Hempseed Oil – 0.2 oz (6.8 grams)- 3%
  • Safflower Oil – 0.3 oz (9.1 grams) – 4%
  • Argan Oil – 0.2 oz (6.8 grams)- 3%
  • Mango Butter – 0.4 oz (11.3 grams) – 5%
  • Vitamin E – 0.1 oz (2.3 grams) – 1%
  • BTMS-50 – 0.6 oz (15.9 grams) – 7%
  • Stearic Acid – 0.1 oz (2.3 grams) – 1%

Cool Down Phase:

  • Carrot Extract – 0.1 oz (2.3 grams) – 1%
  • Green Tea Extract – 0.1 oz (2.3 grams) – 1%
  • Preservative (Optiphen) – 0.1 oz (2.3 grams) – 1%
  • Essential oil blend:  (for 4 ounces of lotion – double the amount if scenting the full 8 ounce batch)
    • Neroli – 6 drops
    • Bergamot (bergaptene free) – 6 drops
    • Vanilla Absolute – 8 drops

Instructions:

Step One:  Weigh Ingredients

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  • Weigh the ingredients per the Water Phase, Oils Phase and Cool Down Phase, and place them in 3 separate containers (at least a 2 cups measuring cup for the water and oil phases).

Step Two:  Heat and Combine Ingredients

sweet16cream3

  • Using 30 second increments, heat the water phase cup in the microwave to 160 degrees F  (71.1 C).  Remove from the microwave.
  • Do the same thing for the oils phase cup.
  • As both containers will cool after removing them from the microwave and stirring them, make sure the water phase is still within a couple of degrees of the oils phase cup and then pour the water into the oils and mix with a spatula or whisk.  Measure the temperature of both cups and make sure it is still above 150 degrees F (65.6 C).  If not, put them back in the microwave again until you get them to the right temperature.

Step Three:  Stir and Blend the Lotion

sweet16cream5

  • Stir with a whisk or spatula for a minute or two then stick blend the mixture using very short bursts of the stick blender to avoid splashing the hot lotion out of the cup  (as the mixture thickens you can stick blend in the normal manner).
  • Stick Blend for at least 3 minutes and then walk away for 10 minutes.  Come back and check on it.   Stick blend again.   Repeat a couple of times until the mixture cools to 110 F (43.3 C) or below.

Step Four:  Finish the Lotion

sweet16cream6

  • Mix in the cool down phase ingredients which you have pre-measured.
  • Add the essential oil blend and mix well.  (Note:  I split the batch in half, so the amount shown in the recipe for the essential oils is for 4 ounces.  If you want to scent all 8 ounces, double the number of drops).

Step Five:  Let the Lotion Cool Over Night

  • With the lid off, let the lotion cool over night.  Then is should be ready to use.

Here it is, still very thin (warm) and foamy from blending.  I am hoping it will “creamify” as it sits overnight.  I am also hoping that it does not separate.  I am not that experienced yet with making substitutions, and I don’t know if using less stearic acid will destabilize it or not.    Finally, I am hoping the unscented jar will be truly unscented and not smell like stearic acid or Optiphen.   Ok, it might be a bit much to hope for, but, a girl has to have goals.

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