What a good pH Meter can do for you

Several months ago, I purchased a pH meter from Lotioncrafter.   At the time, I bought it so that I could measure the pH of my lotions to be sure that they were in the “safe” range for leave-on products (between 4 to 6).

Let’s take a look at why I selected this particular meter, how to calibrate and use it, and how it can help to better create and monitor our products.  You may decide you “need” one, or you may decide you can “live without”. Continue reading “What a good pH Meter can do for you”

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Kraken Slime – A big NOPE

With my recent success at making an emulgel and learning that it is not a true “gel cream” because my emulgel contained a traditional emulsifier (Polawax) along with carbomer instead of using all polymeric emulsifiers, I was left thinking all week long about how to accomplish a true “gel cream”.

I have Sepimax Zen and Carbomer (pre neutralized) so I decided to give a try to a formula containing these two items to make a gel cream.

I did do previous experiments with Sepimax Zen and didn’t care for it, but I thought maybe it could redeem itself in a gel cream rather than as a clear gel.

Continue reading “Kraken Slime – A big NOPE”

Labeling (for personal use)

Part of the perceived value of a product is the packaging.  We don’t want to admit it — but it’s so true!

If I were to slap a handwritten label on my bottle of lotion, it would be nice enough, would get the job done, and be presentable for personal use.  However, the message that a handwritten label sends is that the product is “homespun” and that has a value attached to it.  Some people find that value high (if they are a natural loving person) and some find the value low (if they consider commercial brands to be superior).  Beauty is truly in the eye of the beholder!  A thing of beauty is a joy to behold!  (and so forth).

With a product like handmade, natural soaps, the homespun label fits the product type.  With lotions, however, there is nothing natural about them and the homespun label would completely send the wrong message — at least for my lotions. Continue reading “Labeling (for personal use)”

Why we use distilled water in beauty product formulations

I was just doing some research and noticed that there are different types of water that people typically use in their beauty formulations.   One type is distilled water, which I always use.  Other types are reverse osmosis water, and deionized water.  I believe there are some other types as well, like sterile water.

Typically it is stated in skin-care recipes to never use tap water in our formulations because of the potential for bacterial contamination.  Additionally, the presence of other minerals and substances in the tap water can spoil the product, so just boiling the water to kill the bacteria does not resolve all the issues. Continue reading “Why we use distilled water in beauty product formulations”

Analytical Recipe – Possible dupe of Ellis Brooklyn – Verb – Excellent Body Milk

It has been quite a while since I did a post with an analytical recipe, so today, I have a new one to share with you.

While shopping for beauty products recently, I came across one that looked “duplicatable”.   When looking for a lotion that is “duplicatable”, I look at the ingredients list and see what I have in my stock, or could potentially purchase, to make the recipe.   Many times, commercial brands use ingredients that are not readily available in the “home crafting” market, so you can’t really duplicate them identically.

Continue reading “Analytical Recipe – Possible dupe of Ellis Brooklyn – Verb – Excellent Body Milk”

Sanitization – Two Methods

When making soap, cleanliness is important, of course, but when making lotion, you need to achieve another level of cleanliness — which is sanitization.

To “clean” something means to wash away the debris.  Think of it like washing your dishes by hand.  The warm soapy water and agitation with a wash cloth removes the dirt, grease and grime, but the rinse water can contain bacteria.   The dish towel you wipe the dishes dry with can also contain bacteria.  So the dishes may be “clean” but they are not bacteria-free.

To “sanitize” something means that the item is clean, but also has had about 99% of the bacteria killed off.  Think of it like washing your dishes in the dishwasher — the intense heat and duration of exposure to the heat kills the bacteria. Continue reading “Sanitization – Two Methods”

4 day weekend is kaput. Here is my (long) weekend round-up post.

Wow, that went fast.  I guess I was busy, but I enjoyed every minute of it.

In usual fashion, here is a round-up of my weekend crafting adventures. Continue reading “4 day weekend is kaput. Here is my (long) weekend round-up post.”